Ride the Crazy Train“The truth is that stress doesn’t come from your boss, your kids, your spouse, traffic jams, health challenges, or other circumstances. It comes from your thoughts about these circumstances.”

Andrew J. Bernstein

We started a conversation last week with Time Stress, one of Albrecht’s Four Types of Stress. This week we move to Anticipatory Stress that some people feel continually overwhelms them in almost all areas of their lives. We will discuss how to better manage the common pressures that result from being in this stressed state.

Some people carry a label that says “worry wart”, they continually worry about what could happen in the future. It can be focused on a specific future event or it can be undefined or even vague in nature. These people usually see the glass as half empty and continually feel stressed about what COULD HAPPEN in the future.

Positive visualisation sessions focusing on what will be created as the positive and successful outcome you want is an extremely effective and powerful tool.

This morning I attended a meeting in the city at 9.30am and visualised that I would get a parking spot, on the street, out front of the building where the meeting was being held. The result of my positive visualisation was… the parking space was there when I arrived.

Meditation is a wonderful relaxing tool that is extremely empowering and it allows you to relax. For over twenty years I ran 10 km almost every morning, and now I walk 6km three days a week and swim a km three days a week. This exercise has been and continues to be my time to meditate. You do not have to sit with crossed legs in a yoga pose to meditate. While doing exercise I love in a relaxed mode my mind goes into a beautiful meditative state.

Fear of what lies ahead often springs from a lack of confidence and the fear of failure. Setting yourself an action plan as well as a backup plan can greatly reduce any anticipatory stress that you may have felt in the past.

This blog was written by John Hinwood and republished here with his kind permission.  See more at:  Stress to Strength.